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Posts from the ‘FOOD’ Category

Sucre for 3 weeks, learning Spanish and getting to know Bolivian food

After our rough introduction to Bolivia, we finally made it to Sucre. And like so many travelers before, we fell in love with this city. In fact, it's easily become one of our favorite cities in all of South America. We decided to spend 3 weeks here learning more Spanish and we could have stayed for 3 more. Why all this love for Sucre? Well, that's easy.

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A fitting farewell to Chile & a crazy hello to Bolivia

If any of you remember, we walked into Chile way back on January 28! Since then, we have had a great love affair with this country. Chile has some of the friendliest, most interesting people. People who are innately curious and who offer much in terms of their culture and of course their food! Let's take a walk down Chilean food memory lane.

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Drinking Pisco in Pisco, eating sun-cooked goat & spotting Saturn’s rings

Did you know that there is a war going on? Well, here in Chile, the war against Peru is alive and well and it has been going on for 400 years! Esepcially in the town of Pisco Elqui, when in 1936, the name was changed from La Union to Pisco Elqui just to prove how passionate the Chilean's are about 'their' national beverage, Pisco. Corner any Chilean and ask if Pisco is Peruvian or Chilean and you will likely get a heated, passionate response that will naturally end in favor of Chile. Both Peru and Chile lay claim to fame to this controversial beverage. So who wins? The war rages on!

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Earthquake!!

Now that I have your attention, no there wasn't an ACTUAL earthquake here in Chile, although the drink we tried is named for Chile's notorious past with these natural disasters. The earthquake we experienced was the 'Terremoto drink'. It's definitely not fancy enough to be called a cocktail!

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Would you like some crazy with your may?

What's up with that title? Crazy with may? What does that mean?! Have I completely lost it? 6 months of traveling and now I've gone mad? No, I am simply referring to 'locos con mayo' and one of Chile's more humorous translations.

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Do you want to discover the secrets of Mapuche cooking?

Who or what is Mapuche? Mapuche refers to the indiginous people in Chile comprising about 10% of Chile's total population (a smaller amount live in parts of southwestern Argentina too). The Araucanía region in Chile is home to the largest concentration of these people with 80% of the Mapuche people living there

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Discovering crudo in Valdivia & realizing the f-ing Germans are everywhere!

After Cochamo, we ventured out to Valdivia. I was told that I shouldn't miss the market there because it's full of fresh seafood and it's true. Although small in size, it's a market lovers paradise. You can purchase different types of fresh fish & get it cut up right on the spot to take home & cook up a feast

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A visit to the island of Chiloe & discovering some of Chile’s best fish

We finally made it to Puerto Montt, beyond exhausted. We were pretty disheveled at this point. The ferry arrived at 6 am and we made our way through a real city! Puerto Montt has just about 200,000 people, so not such a big city by real world standards but for us, it was the largest city we had seen in a very long time. Huge, real double-decker (!) buses rushed passed us. After seeing just minibuses for the past month, these buses looked heavenly.

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The wine capital of the northwest, Cafayate. Getting to know Torrontés

Ah, wine. I love wine. Who doesn't love a great wine? If you love wine like me and are interested in learning more about a grape you probably haven't heard of, well listen up!

When most people think of wines from Argentina, immediately they think of the lovely Malbec. But Argentina has more to offer than just this red grape. The north of Argentina is home to one of the most beautiful wine regions in the country, Cafayate and it's shining star, the Torrontés grape. What the malbec grape has done for Mendoza, the torrontés grape does for Cafayate.

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From quinoa filets to llama stew….exploring the foods of the Andean Argentinian northwest

So we didn’t just road trip our way through the northwest snapping photos of the amazing scenery. We also ate. A lot. Prior to our journey, I had read about the unique cuisine of the Andan north of Argentina. So I knew to expect specialties like humitas, tamales, llama stews and other hearty dishes like locro and carbonada. While visiting this region, I made it a point to try all of these local dishes, as well as take notes comparing empanadas from Tucuman up to Salta (very different in style). It was a difficult task but a tasty one that I was certainly up for!

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